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Zev Rosenberg teaches session VII of a Course entitled "The Mountain Top View: What Jesus Wants us to See". The course will continue through June 17th.

In this seventh session, Zev discusses bringing the teachings of Jesus down from the moutain top to the city.

Please join us for this Westminster Class at Christ Presbyterian Church, 530 Tuscarawas St. W., Canton, OH 44702. The class meets every Sunday at 9:15 am in Westminster Hall.

John David Geib and Zev Rosenberg teach session VI of a Course entitled "The Mountain Top View: What Jesus Wants us to See". The course will continue through June 17th.

In this sixth session, Zev and John discuss the meaning of Christ's view on how we address issues of the environment, the economics, discrimination and politics in our community.

Please join us for this Westminster Class at Christ Presbyterian Church, 530 Tuscarawas St. W., Canton, OH 44702. The class meets every Sunday at 9:15 am in Westminster Hall.

John David Geib and Zev Rosenberg teach session V of a Course entitled "The Mountain Top View: What Jesus Wants us to See". The course will continue through June 17th.

In this fifth session, Zev and John discuss the New Covenant of Christ.

Please join us for this Westminster Class at Christ Presbyterian Church, 530 Tuscarawas St. W., Canton, OH 44702. The class meets every Sunday at 9:15 am in Westminster Hall.

John David Geib and Zev Rosenberg teach session V of a Course entitled "The Mountain Top View: What Jesus Wants us to See". The course will continue through June 17th.

In this fifth session, Zev and John discuss the New Covenant of Christ.

Please join us for this Westminster Class at Christ Presbyterian Church, 530 Tuscarawas St. W., Canton, OH 44702. The class meets every Sunday at 9:15 am in Westminster Hall.

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John David Geib and Zev Rosenberg teach session IV of a Course entitled "The Mountain Top View: What Jesus Wants us to See". The course will continue through June 17th.

In this third session, Zev and John discuss the Sermon on the Mount line by line.

Please join us for this Westminster Class at Christ Presbyterian Church, 530 Tuscarawas St. W., Canton, OH 44702. The class meets every Sunday at 9:15 am in Westminster Hall.

John David Geib and Zev Rosenberg teach session III of a Course entitled "The Mountain Top View: What Jesus Wants us to See". The course will continue through June 17th.

In this third session, Zev Rosenberg explains the meaning of the Sermon on the Mount for those hearing it in the 1st Century.

The Sermon on the Mount will be a focus of the course.

Please join us for this Westminster Class at Christ Presbyterian Church, 530 Tuscarawas St. W., Canton, OH 44702. The class meets every Sunday at 9:15 am in Westminster Hall.

(HANDOUT) John David Geib and Zev Rosenberg teach session III of a Course entitled "The Mountain Top View: What Jesus Wants us to See". The course will continue through June 17th.

In this second session the thesis, structure and devices used in the Book of Matthew will be examined.

The Sermon on the Mount will be a focus of the course.

Please join us for this Westminster Class at Christ Presbyterian Church, 530 Tuscarawas St. W., Canton, OH 44702. The class meets every Sunday at 9:15 am in Westminster Hall.

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(HANDOUT) John David Geib and Zev Rosenberg teach session II of a Course entitled "The Mountain Top View: What Jesus Wants us to See". The course will continue through June 17th.

In this second session the thesis, structure and devices used in the Book of Matthew will be examined.

The Sermon on the Mount will be a focus of the course.

Please join us for this Westminster Class at Christ Presbyterian Church, 530 Tuscarawas St. W., Canton, OH 44702. The class meets every Sunday at 9:15 am in Westminster Hall.

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John David Geib and Zev Rosenberg teach session II of a Course entitled "The Mountain Top View: What Jesus Wants us to See". The course will continue through June 17th.

In this second session the thesis, structure and devices used in the Book of Matthew will be examined.

The Sermon on the Mount will be a focus of the course.

Please join us for this Westminster Class at Christ Presbyterian Church, 530 Tuscarawas St. W., Canton, OH 44702. The class meets every Sunday at 9:15 am in Westminster Hall.

(HANDOUT)

John David Geib and Zev Rosenberg teach session I of a Course entitled "The Mountain Top View: What Jesus Wants us to See". The course will continue through June 17th.

During the first session, the Leo Tolstoy's short story "Where Love Is, There God is Also" was discussed. The story can be read online at https://en.m.wikisource.org/wiki/Where_Love_is,_There_God_is_Also 

For those who use a Kindle, the story can be downloaded for free at https://www.amazon.com/Where-Love-There-God-Also-ebook/dp/B0071FCQ9A/ref=sr_1_1_twi_kin_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1523838425&sr=8-1&keywords=where+love+is+there+god+is+also+by+leo+tolstoy

The Sermon on the Mount will be a focus of the course.

Please join us for this Westminster Class at Christ Presbyterian Church, 530 Tuscarawas St. W., Canton, OH 44702, phone: (330) 456-8113. The class meets every Sunday at 9:15 am in Westminster Hall.

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John David Geib and Zev Rosenberg teach session I of a Course entitled "The Mountain Top View: What Jesus Wants us to See". The course will continue through June 17th.

During the first session, the Leo Tolstoy's short story "Where Love Is, There God is Also" was discussed. The story can be read online at https://en.m.wikisource.org/wiki/Where_Love_is,_There_God_is_Also 

For those who use a Kindle, the story can be downloaded for free at https://www.amazon.com/Where-Love-There-God-Also-ebook/dp/B0071FCQ9A/ref=sr_1_1_twi_kin_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1523838425&sr=8-1&keywords=where+love+is+there+god+is+also+by+leo+tolstoy

The Sermon on the Mount will be a focus of the course.

Please join us for this Westminster Class at Christ Presbyterian Church, 530 Tuscarawas St. W., Canton, OH 44702, phone: (330) 456-8113. The class meets every Sunday at 9:15 am in Westminster Hall.

The Westminster Hall Sunday School class welcomes Uri and Gili Hershkovitz, this year’s Akron-Canton Israeli emissaries.  They will be telling the story of Israel through their personal stories:  How their families came to Israel, and Israel today, who lives there and what it is like growing up there.  They will be discussing the varied population both ethnic and religious, talk about the IDF and its important role in Israel society, and lastly take a look outward at Israel’s relationship with countries abroad.

"Major stuff from the minor prophets" This Sunday we study Daniel XII.  Continuing through March 25, the Westminster Sunday School class will study Daniel, with Rev. Dr. Debbie Rundlett, Rev. Dave de Vries, and Rev. Michael Wallace

"Major stuff from the minor prophets" This Sunday we study Daniel XI.  Continuing through March 25, the Westminster Sunday School class will study Daniel, with Rev. Dr. Debbie Rundlett, Rev. Dave de Vries, and Rev. Michael Wallace

"Major stuff from the minor prophets" This Sunday we study Daniel X.  Continuing through March 25, the Westminster Sunday School class will study Daniel, with Rev. Dr. Debbie Rundlett, Rev. Dave de Vries, and Rev. Michael Wallace.

"Major stuff from the minor prophets" This Sunday we study Daniel IX.  Continuing through March 25, the Westminster Sunday School class will study Daniel, with Rev. Dr. Debbie Rundlett, Rev. Dave de Vries, and Rev. Michael Wallace.

"Major stuff from the minor prophets" This Sunday we study Daniel VIII.  Continuing through March 25, the Westminster Sunday School class will study Daniel, with Rev. Dr. Debbie Rundlett, Rev. Dave de Vries, and Rev. Michael Wallace.

"Major stuff from the minor prophets" This Sunday we study Daniel VII.  Continuing through March 25, the Westminster Sunday School class will study Daniel, with Rev. Dr. Debbie Rundlett, Rev. Dave de Vries, and Rev. Michael Wallace.

HANDOUT "Major stuff from the minor prophets" This Sunday we study Daniel VII.  Continuing through March 25, the Westminster Sunday School class will study Daniel, with Rev. Dr. Debbie Rundlett, Rev. Dave de Vries, and Rev. Michael Wallace.

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"Major stuff from the minor prophets" This Sunday we study Daniel VI.  Continuing through March 25, the Westminster Sunday School class will study Daniel, with Rev. Dr. Debbie Rundlett, Rev. Dave de Vries, and Rev. Michael Wallace.

"Major stuff from the minor prophets" This Sunday we study Daniel V.  Continuing through March 25, the Westminster Sunday School class will study Daniel, with Rev. Dr. Debbie Rundlett, Rev. Dave de Vries, and Rev. Michael Wallace.

HANDOUT: “Major Stuff from the Minor Prophets - Daniel”.

"Major stuff from the minor prophets" This Sunday we study Daniel V.  Continuing through March 25, the Westminster Sunday School class will study Daniel, with Rev. Dr. Debbie Rundlett, Rev. Dave de Vries, and Rev. Michael Wallace.

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"Major stuff from the minor prophets" This Sunday we study Daniel IV.  Continuing through March 25, the Westminster Sunday School class will study Daniel, with Rev. Dr. Debbie Rundlett, Rev. Dave de Vries, and Rev. Michael Wallace.

"Major stuff from the minor prophets" This Sunday we study Daniel III.  Continuing through March 25, the Westminster Sunday School class will study Daniel, with Rev. Dr. Debbie Rundlett, Rev. Dave de Vries, and Rev. Michael Wallace.

"Major stuff from the minor prophets" This Sunday we study Daniel II.  Continuing through March 25, the Westminster Sunday School class will study Daniel, with Rev. Dr. Debbie Rundlett, Rev. Dave de Vries, and Rev. Michael Wallace.

"Major stuff from the minor prophets" This first Sunday we study Daniel I.  Continuing through March 25, the Westminster Sunday School class will study Daniel, with Rev. Dr. Debbie Rundlett, Rev. Dave de Vries, and Rev. Michael Wallace.

This five-week series will take a closer look at the church’s relation to five key issues, each of which has defined and expressed the very nature of its attitudes toward human rights:

(1) Slavery, not just a nightmare in the past;

(2) War and Violence;

(3) Gender and Sexual Abuse;

(4) Nazis and White Supremists;

(5) Human Rights in the Current Political Climate.

This series continues the season’s emphasis on the Protestant Church by focusing on its historical and current reaction to issues related to Human Rights and Dignity. According to John Witte Jr., in his article, "Law, Religion, and Human Rights: A Historical Protestant Perspective," "Human rights are, in substantial part, the modern political fruits of ancient religious beliefs and practices - ancient Jewish constructions of covenant and mitzvot, ancient Qu'ranic texts on peace and the common good, Roman Catholic canon law concepts of ius and libertas, classic Protestant ideals of freedom and conscience. Religious communities must be open to a new human rights hermeneutic - fresh methods of interpreting their sacred texts and traditions that will allow them both to reclaim the long-obscured roles that their traditions have played in the cultivation of human rights in the past and to lay claim to familiar principles and practices within these traditions that are conducive to the development of human rights in the future" (The Journal of Religious Ethics, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Fall, 1998), pp. 257-262.)

HANDOUT

This five-week series will take a closer look at the church’s relation to five key issues, each of which has defined and expressed the very nature of its attitudes toward human rights:

(1) Slavery, not just a nightmare in the past;

(2) War and Violence;

(3) Gender and Sexual Abuse;

(4) Nazis and White Supremists;

(5) Human Rights in the Current Political Climate.

This series continues the season’s emphasis on the Protestant Church by focusing on its historical and current reaction to issues related to Human Rights and Dignity. According to John Witte Jr., in his article, "Law, Religion, and Human Rights: A Historical Protestant Perspective," "Human rights are, in substantial part, the modern political fruits of ancient religious beliefs and practices - ancient Jewish constructions of covenant and mitzvot, ancient Qu'ranic texts on peace and the common good, Roman Catholic canon law concepts of ius and libertas, classic Protestant ideals of freedom and conscience. Religious communities must be open to a new human rights hermeneutic - fresh methods of interpreting their sacred texts and traditions that will allow them both to reclaim the long-obscured roles that their traditions have played in the cultivation of human rights in the past and to lay claim to familiar principles and practices within these traditions that are conducive to the development of human rights in the future" (The Journal of Religious Ethics, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Fall, 1998), pp. 257-262.)

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This five-week series will take a closer look at the church’s relation to five key issues, each of which has defined and expressed the very nature of its attitudes toward human rights:

(1) Slavery, not just a nightmare in the past;

(2) War and Violence;

(3) Gender and Sexual Abuse;

(4) Nazis and White Supremists;

(5) Human Rights in the Current Political Climate.

This series continues the season’s emphasis on the Protestant Church by focusing on its historical and current reaction to issues related to Human Rights and Dignity. According to John Witte Jr., in his article, "Law, Religion, and Human Rights: A Historical Protestant Perspective," "Human rights are, in substantial part, the modern political fruits of ancient religious beliefs and practices - ancient Jewish constructions of covenant and mitzvot, ancient Qu'ranic texts on peace and the common good, Roman Catholic canon law concepts of ius and libertas, classic Protestant ideals of freedom and conscience. Religious communities must be open to a new human rights hermeneutic - fresh methods of interpreting their sacred texts and traditions that will allow them both to reclaim the long-obscured roles that their traditions have played in the cultivation of human rights in the past and to lay claim to familiar principles and practices within these traditions that are conducive to the development of human rights in the future" (The Journal of Religious Ethics, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Fall, 1998), pp. 257-262.)

HANDOUT

This five-week series will take a closer look at the church’s relation to five key issues, each of which has defined and expressed the very nature of its attitudes toward human rights:

(1) Slavery, not just a nightmare in the past;

(2) War and Violence;

(3) Gender and Sexual Abuse;

(4) Nazis and White Supremists;

(5) Human Rights in the Current Political Climate.

This series continues the season’s emphasis on the Protestant Church by focusing on its historical and current reaction to issues related to Human Rights and Dignity. According to John Witte Jr., in his article, "Law, Religion, and Human Rights: A Historical Protestant Perspective," "Human rights are, in substantial part, the modern political fruits of ancient religious beliefs and practices - ancient Jewish constructions of covenant and mitzvot, ancient Qu'ranic texts on peace and the common good, Roman Catholic canon law concepts of ius and libertas, classic Protestant ideals of freedom and conscience. Religious communities must be open to a new human rights hermeneutic - fresh methods of interpreting their sacred texts and traditions that will allow them both to reclaim the long-obscured roles that their traditions have played in the cultivation of human rights in the past and to lay claim to familiar principles and practices within these traditions that are conducive to the development of human rights in the future" (The Journal of Religious Ethics, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Fall, 1998), pp. 257-262.)

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This five-week series will take a closer look at the church’s relation to five key issues, each of which has defined and expressed the very nature of its attitudes toward human rights:

(1) Slavery, not just a nightmare in the past;

(2) War and Violence;

(3) Gender and Sexual Abuse;

(4) Nazis and White Supremists;

(5) Human Rights in the Current Political Climate.

This series continues the season’s emphasis on the Protestant Church by focusing on its historical and current reaction to issues related to Human Rights and Dignity. According to John Witte Jr., in his article, "Law, Religion, and Human Rights: A Historical Protestant Perspective," "Human rights are, in substantial part, the modern political fruits of ancient religious beliefs and practices - ancient Jewish constructions of covenant and mitzvot, ancient Qu'ranic texts on peace and the common good, Roman Catholic canon law concepts of ius and libertas, classic Protestant ideals of freedom and conscience. Religious communities must be open to a new human rights hermeneutic - fresh methods of interpreting their sacred texts and traditions that will allow them both to reclaim the long-obscured roles that their traditions have played in the cultivation of human rights in the past and to lay claim to familiar principles and practices within these traditions that are conducive to the development of human rights in the future" (The Journal of Religious Ethics, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Fall, 1998), pp. 257-262.)

HANDOUT This five-week series will take a closer look at the church’s relation to five key issues, each of which has defined and expressed the very nature of its attitudes toward human rights:

(1) Slavery, not just a nightmare in the past;

(2) War and Violence;

(3) Gender and Sexual Abuse;

(4) Nazis and White Supremists;

(5) Human Rights in the Current Political Climate.

This series continues the season’s emphasis on the Protestant Church by focusing on its historical and current reaction to issues related to Human Rights and Dignity. According to John Witte Jr., in his article, "Law, Religion, and Human Rights: A Historical Protestant Perspective," "Human rights are, in substantial part, the modern political fruits of ancient religious beliefs and practices - ancient Jewish constructions of covenant and mitzvot, ancient Qu'ranic texts on peace and the common good, Roman Catholic canon law concepts of ius and libertas, classic Protestant ideals of freedom and conscience. Religious communities must be open to a new human rights hermeneutic - fresh methods of interpreting their sacred texts and traditions that will allow them both to reclaim the long-obscured roles that their traditions have played in the cultivation of human rights in the past and to lay claim to familiar principles and practices within these traditions that are conducive to the development of human rights in the future" (The Journal of Religious Ethics, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Fall, 1998), pp. 257-262.)

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This five-week series will take a closer look at the church’s relation to five key issues, each of which has defined and expressed the very nature of its attitudes toward human rights:

(1) Slavery, not just a nightmare in the past;

(2) War and Violence;

(3) Gender and Sexual Abuse;

(4) Nazis and White Supremists;

(5) Human Rights in the Current Political Climate.

This series continues the season’s emphasis on the Protestant Church by focusing on its historical and current reaction to issues related to Human Rights and Dignity. According to John Witte Jr., in his article, "Law, Religion, and Human Rights: A Historical Protestant Perspective," "Human rights are, in substantial part, the modern political fruits of ancient religious beliefs and practices - ancient Jewish constructions of covenant and mitzvot, ancient Qu'ranic texts on peace and the common good, Roman Catholic canon law concepts of ius and libertas, classic Protestant ideals of freedom and conscience. Religious communities must be open to a new human rights hermeneutic - fresh methods of interpreting their sacred texts and traditions that will allow them both to reclaim the long-obscured roles that their traditions have played in the cultivation of human rights in the past and to lay claim to familiar principles and practices within these traditions that are conducive to the development of human rights in the future" (The Journal of Religious Ethics, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Fall, 1998), pp. 257-262.)

HANDOUT

This five-week series will take a closer look at the church’s relation to five key issues, each of which has defined and expressed the very nature of its attitudes toward human rights:

(1) Slavery, not just a nightmare in the past;

(2) War and Violence;

(3) Gender and Sexual Abuse;

(4) Nazis and White Supremists;

(5) Human Rights in the Current Political Climate.

This series continues the season’s emphasis on the Protestant Church by focusing on its historical and current reaction to issues related to Human Rights and Dignity. According to John Witte Jr., in his article, "Law, Religion, and Human Rights: A Historical Protestant Perspective," "Human rights are, in substantial part, the modern political fruits of ancient religious beliefs and practices - ancient Jewish constructions of covenant and mitzvot, ancient Qu'ranic texts on peace and the common good, Roman Catholic canon law concepts of ius and libertas, classic Protestant ideals of freedom and conscience. Religious communities must be open to a new human rights hermeneutic - fresh methods of interpreting their sacred texts and traditions that will allow them both to reclaim the long-obscured roles that their traditions have played in the cultivation of human rights in the past and to lay claim to familiar principles and practices within these traditions that are conducive to the development of human rights in the future" (The Journal of Religious Ethics, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Fall, 1998), pp. 257-262.)

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This five-week series will take a closer look at the church’s relation to five key issues, each of which has defined and expressed the very nature of its attitudes toward human rights:

(1) Slavery, not just a nightmare in the past;

(2) War and Violence;

(3) Gender and Sexual Abuse;

(4) Nazis and White Supremists;

(5) Human Rights in the Current Political Climate.

This series continues the season’s emphasis on the Protestant Church by focusing on its historical and current reaction to issues related to Human Rights and Dignity. According to John Witte Jr., in his article, "Law, Religion, and Human Rights: A Historical Protestant Perspective," "Human rights are, in substantial part, the modern political fruits of ancient religious beliefs and practices - ancient Jewish constructions of covenant and mitzvot, ancient Qu'ranic texts on peace and the common good, Roman Catholic canon law concepts of ius and libertas, classic Protestant ideals of freedom and conscience. Religious communities must be open to a new human rights hermeneutic - fresh methods of interpreting their sacred texts and traditions that will allow them both to reclaim the long-obscured roles that their traditions have played in the cultivation of human rights in the past and to lay claim to familiar principles and practices within these traditions that are conducive to the development of human rights in the future" (The Journal of Religious Ethics, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Fall, 1998), pp. 257-262.)

This five-week series will take a closer look at the church’s relation to five key issues, each of which has defined and expressed the very nature of its attitudes toward human rights:

(1) Slavery, not just a nightmare in the past;

(2) War and Violence;

(3) Gender and Sexual Abuse;

(4) Nazis and White Supremists;

(5) Human Rights in the Current Political Climate.

This series continues the season’s emphasis on the Protestant Church by focusing on its historical and current reaction to issues related to Human Rights and Dignity. According to John Witte Jr., in his article, "Law, Religion, and Human Rights: A Historical Protestant Perspective," "Human rights are, in substantial part, the modern political fruits of ancient religious beliefs and practices - ancient Jewish constructions of covenant and mitzvot, ancient Qu'ranic texts on peace and the common good, Roman Catholic canon law concepts of ius and libertas, classic Protestant ideals of freedom and conscience. Religious communities must be open to a new human rights hermeneutic - fresh methods of interpreting their sacred texts and traditions that will allow them both to reclaim the long-obscured roles that their traditions have played in the cultivation of human rights in the past and to lay claim to familiar principles and practices within these traditions that are conducive to the development of human rights in the future" (The Journal of Religious Ethics, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Fall, 1998), pp. 257-262.)

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2017 marks the 500 year anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. To commemorate that pivotal event, during the months of September and October, the Westminster Hall Sunday School class (9:15-10:15 a.m.) will study both the Presbyterian Book of Confessions, as well as the Reformation.

The Reformers & their Big Ideas, presented by Zev Rosenberg

Oct 8     Forerunners of the Reformation (Marsilius of Padua, John Wycliffe, Jan Hus)

Oct 15   Focus on Martin Luther

Oct 22   Focus on the Reformed Tradition (Zwingli, Bullinger, Calvin & Knox)

Oct 29   Focus on the English & Radical Reformations

Nov 5    Ecclesia Reformata, Semper Reformanda (need for continued reformation)

2017 marks the 500 year anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. To commemorate that pivotal event, during the months of September and October, the Westminster Hall Sunday School class (9:15-10:15 a.m.) will study both the Presbyterian Book of Confessions, as well as the Reformation.

In this session, Zev Rosenberg leads us in reflecting on the development of the big idea - separation of church and state and concepts of nonviolence and peace.

NOTE: THIS AUDIO RECORDING IS SUBPAR AND WILL CUT OUT OCCASIONALLY.

The Reformers & their Big Ideas, presented by Zev Rosenberg

Oct 8     Forerunners of the Reformation (Marsilius of Padua, John Wycliffe, Jan Hus)

Oct 15   Focus on Martin Luther

Oct 22   Focus on the Reformed Tradition (Zwingli, Bullinger, Calvin & Knox)

Oct 29   Focus on the English & Radical Reformations

Nov 5    Ecclesia Reformata, Semper Reformanda (need for continued reformation)

2017 marks the 500 year anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. To commemorate that pivotal event, during the months of September and October, the Westminster Hall Sunday School class (9:15-10:15 a.m.) will study both the Presbyterian Book of Confessions, as well as the Reformation.

In this session, Zev Rosenberg leads us in study of Huldrych Zwingli, Heinrich Bullinger, John Calvin and John Knox.

Four Big Ideas

The Memorial of the Eucharist - Zwingli

Covenant Theology - Bullinger

Absolute soverignty of God - Calvin

Presbyterian Church Government - Knox

 

The Reformers & their Big Ideas, presented by Zev Rosenberg

Oct 8     Forerunners of the Reformation (Marsilius of Padua, John Wycliffe, Jan Hus)

Oct 15   Focus on Martin Luther

Oct 22   Focus on the Reformed Tradition (Zwingli, Bullinger, Calvin & Knox)

Oct 29   Focus on the English & Radical Reformations

Nov 5    Ecclesia Reformata, Semper Reformanda (need for continued reformation)

2017 marks the 500 year anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. To commemorate that pivotal event, during the months of September and October, the Westminster Hall Sunday School class (9:15-10:15 a.m.) will study both the Presbyterian Book of Confessions, as well as the Reformation.

In this session, Zev Rosenberg leads us in study of Martin Luther and the 95 Theses.

Homework: Read 95 Theses of Luther http://www.crivoice.org/creed95theses.html#english

The Reformers & their Big Ideas, presented by Zev Rosenberg

Oct 8     Forerunners of the Reformation (Marsilius of Padua, John Wycliffe, Jan Hus)

Oct 15   Focus on Martin Luther

Oct 22   Focus on the Reformed Tradition (Zwingli, Bullinger, Calvin & Knox)

Oct 29   Focus on the English & Radical Reformations

Nov 5    Ecclesia Reformata, Semper Reformanda (need for continued reformation)

2017 marks the 500 year anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. To commemorate that pivotal event, during the months of September and October, the Westminster Hall Sunday School class (9:15-10:15 a.m.) will study both the Presbyterian Book of Confessions, as well as the Reformation.

In this session, Zev Rosenberg starts the first of five sessions (Oct. 8- Nov. 5) on the History of the Reformation. He will explore such questions as: Who paved the way for the Reformation? Who were the main reformers? Why did the Church need reformation? Does the church still need reform?

Homework: Read 95 Theses of Luther http://www.crivoice.org/creed95theses.html#english

The Reformers & their Big Ideas, presented by Zev Rosenberg

Oct 8     Forerunners of the Reformation (Marsilius of Padua, John Wycliffe, Jan Hus)

Oct 15   Focus on Martin Luther

Oct 22   Focus on the Reformed Tradition (Zwingli, Bullinger, Calvin & Knox)

Oct 29   Focus on the English & Radical Reformations

Nov 5    Ecclesia Reformata, Semper Reformanda (need for continued reformation)

 

The Confessions and the Reformation 2017 marks the 500 year anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. To commemorate that pivotal event, during the months of September and October, the Westminster Hall Sunday School class will study both the Presbyterian Book of Confessions, as well as the Reformation. We will consider how both this collection of confessions and the break away from the Roman Catholic Church have present-day impact on our faith and theology.                                           

 The course will run through November 5, 2017. Class starts at 9:15 am every Sunday.

The Confessions and the Reformation 2017 marks the 500 year anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. To commemorate that pivotal event, during the months of September and October, the Westminster Hall Sunday School class will study both the Presbyterian Book of Confessions, as well as the Reformation. We will consider how both this collection of confessions and the break away from the Roman Catholic Church have present-day impact on our faith and theology.

The Confessions and the Reformation 2017 marks the 500 year anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. To commemorate that pivotal event, during the months of September and October, the Westminster Hall Sunday School class will study both the Presbyterian Book of Confessions, as well as the Reformation. We will consider how both this collection of confessions and the break away from the Roman Catholic Church have present-day impact on our faith and theology.                                           

 The course will run through November 5, 2017. Class starts at 9:15 am every Sunday.

The Confessions and the Reformation 2017 marks the 500 year anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. To commemorate that pivotal event, during the months of September and October, the Westminster Hall Sunday School class will study both the Presbyterian Book of Confessions, as well as the Reformation. We will consider how both this collection of confessions and the break away from the Roman Catholic Church have present-day impact on our faith and theology.                                           

 The course will run through November 5, 2017. Class starts at 9:15 am every Sunday.

The Confessions and the Reformation 2017 marks the 500 year anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. To commemorate that pivotal event, during the months of September and October, the Westminster Hall Sunday School class will study both the Presbyterian Book of Confessions, as well as the Reformation. We will consider how both this collection of confessions and the break away from the Roman Catholic Church have present-day impact on our faith and theology.                                           

 The course will run through November 5, 2017. Class starts at 9:15 am every Sunday.

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This is the tenth and last class of the "Co-Exist: Is it Possible?" discussing the possibility of coexistence among revealed faiths led by Zev Rosenberg.

The Westminster Class of Christ Church is sponsoring a course titled “Co-exist: Is it Possible?” at Christ Church, 530 Tuscarawas St W, Canton OH, in the Westminster Hall, 9:15 – 10:15 am, every Sunday from April 23 through June 25, 2017.

The course will be a collegial conversation about Islamic and Christian relations between students and John David Geib, Zev Rosenberg, Dr. Ramez Islambouli and Imam Jaffar Juma.

This is the ninth class of the "Co-Exist: Is it Possible?" a panel discussion with Zev Rosenberg, Imam Jaffar Juma, Pastor De Vries and Johhn David Geib.

The Westminster Class of Christ Church is sponsoring a course titled “Co-exist: Is it Possible?” at Christ Church, 530 Tuscarawas St W, Canton OH, in the Westminster Hall, 9:15 – 10:15 am, every Sunday from April 23 through June 25, 2017.

The course will be a collegial conversation about Islamic and Christian relations between students and John David Geib, Zev Rosenberg, Dr. Ramez Islambouli and Imam Jaffar Juma.

This is the eighth class of the "Co-Exist: Is it Possible?" series taught by Imam Jaffar Juma speaking about Chrisitan/Islamic Relations".

The Westminster Class of Christ Church is sponsoring a course titled “Co-exist: Is it Possible?” at Christ Church, 530 Tuscarawas St W, Canton OH, in the Westminster Hall, 9:15 – 10:15 am, every Sunday from April 23 through June 25, 2017.

The course will be a collegial conversation about Islamic and Christian relations between students and John David Geib, Zev Rosenberg, Dr. Ramez Islambouli and Imam Jaffar Juma.

HANDOUT This is the seventh class of the "Co-Exist: Is it Possible?" series taught by John David Geib. The title of this class is "Three Historical Approaches of Christians to Islam."

The Westminster Class of Christ Church is sponsoring a course titled “Co-exist: Is it Possible?” at Christ Church, 530 Tuscarawas St W, Canton OH, in the Westminster Hall, 9:15 – 10:15 am, every Sunday from April 23 through June 25, 2017.

The course will be a collegial conversation about Islamic and Christian relations between students and John David Geib, Zev Rosenberg, Dr. Ramez Islambouli and Imam Jaffar Juma.

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